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Part 422 – Reading Comprehension Previous Year Questions

Directions: Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. Every profession or trade, every art and every science has its technical vocabulary, the function of which is partly to designate things or processes which have no names in ordinary English and partly to secure greater exactness in nomenclature. Such special dialects or jargons are necessary in technical discussion of any kind. Being universally understood by the devotees of the particular science or art, they have the precision of a mathematical formula. Besides, they save time, for it is much more economical to name a process than to describe it. Thousands of these technical terms are very properly included in every large dictionary, yet, as a whole, they are rather on the outskirts of the English language than actually within its borders. Different occupations, however, differ widely in the character of their special vocabularies. In trades and handicrafts and other vocations like farming and fishing that have occupied great numbers of men from remote times, the technical vocabulary is very old. An average man now uses these in his own vocabulary. The special dialects of law, medicine, divinity and philosophy have become familiar to cultivated persons.

Q1. Special words used in technical discussion
(a) may become part of common speech
(b) never last long
(c) should resemble mathematical formula
(d) should be confined to scientific fields
Ans: (a) may become part of common speech.

Q2. The writer of this article is
(a) a scientist (b) a politician
(c) a linguist (d) a businessman
Ans: (c) a linguist.

Q3. This passage is primarily concerned with.
(a) various occupations and professions
(b) technical terminology
(c) scientific undertakings
(d) a new language
Ans: (b) technical terminology.

Q4. It is true that.
(a) various occupations and professions often interchange words.
(b) there is always a nontechnical word that may be substituted for the technical word.
(c) the average man often uses his own vocabulary what was once technical language not meant for him.
(d) everyone is interested in scientific findings.
Ans: (c) the average man often uses his own vocabulary what was once technical language not meant for him
Directions: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. My worries were increasing. The boy at the shop was becoming more clamorous. My sales were poor, as the railways were admitting more pedlars on the platforms. My cash receipts were going down and my credit sales alone flourished. The wholesale merchants who supplied me with goods stopped credit to me. The boy’s method of accountkeeping was so chaotic that I did not know whether I was moving forward or backward. He produced cash from the counter in a haphazard manner, and there were immense gaps on the shelves all over the shop. The complaint by the public was that nothing one wanted was ever available. Suddenly the railways gave me notice to quit. I pleaded with the old stationmaster and porter, but they could do nothing; the order had come from high up. The shop was given to a new contractor. I could not contemplate the prospect of being cut off from the railways. I grew desperate and angry. I shed tears at seeing a new man in the place where I and my father had sat. I slapped the boy on the cheek and he cried, and his father, the porter, came down on me and said, ‘this is what he gets for helping you I’d always told the boy – He was not your paid servant, anyway.’ MEANING OF WORDS/PHRASES (a) clamorous (Adj.): noisy (b) pedlars (N.): someone who travels about selling his wares (on the streets/at carnivals) (c) chaotic (Adj.): in a state of complete confusion and lack of order (d) contemplate (V.): think about/of (5) cut off ; to be separate from others

Q5. Why does the speaker say that his sales were poor ?
(a) Because his cash receipts were going down.
(b) Because the boy at the shop was becoming more clamorous.
(c) Because the railways were admitting more pedlars on the platform.
(d) Because there were no buyers.
Ans: (c)Because the railways were admitting more pedlars on the platform.

Q6. How did the boy’s method of accountkeeping affect the speaker ?
(a) His worries increased.
(b) He produced cash from the counter in a haphazard manner.
(c) His sales were poor.
(d) He did not know if he was moving forward or backward.
Ans: (d) He did not know if he was moving forward or backward.

Q7. Why did the public complain?
(a) Because his credit at the wholesalers’ was gone.
(b) Because nothing one ever wanted was available.
(c) Because there were gaps on the shelves all over the shop.
(d) Because the railways gave him notice to quit.
Ans: (b) Because nothing one ever wanted was available.

Q8. Where did the order to quit come from?
(a) From the old station master.
(b) From high up.
(c) From the railway authorities.
(d) From the contractor.
Ans: (b) From high up.

Q9. Why did the speaker shed tears?
(a) Because he saw a new person, where he and his father had sat.
(b) Because he was cut off from the railways.
(c) Because he grew desperate and angry.
(d) Because he slapped the boy on the cheek.
Ans: (a) Because he saw a new person, where he and his father had sat.
Directions: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. Even the majority of elders turn their homes into hives of worry as they have too little to do in too much time. Those who have retired thus find retirement tiresome when hobbies, instead, could have turned it into a period of creativity and contentment. This common problem of inability to utilise leisure pleasurably and profitably is not restricted to Indians. In fact, Japanese are the worse sufferers. Their weekends, rather than increase their enjoyment of life, have wreaked havoc on their health and happiness. Unable to while away the long, unstructured hours, many of them have become addicts to coffee or hard liquor, and have even taken to gambling. How has this social malady come about? Ironically, the syllabusloaded education system is the main culprit. It places a heavy work–load on children and youth, laying emphasis as it does on memory rather than intelligence.

Q10. Why do a majority of retired elders find retirement tiresome?
(a) Because their homes have been turned into hives of worry.
(b) Because they do not have hobbies to utilise their free time.
(c) Because they had nothing to do.
(d) Because they had plenty of free time.
Ans: (a) Because their homes have been turned into hives of worry.

Q11. How have the Japanese benefitted from their weekends?
(a) They have increased enjoyment in life.
(b) They enjoy health and happiness.
(c) They use their free time to increase their enjoyment.
(d) They become addicts to coffee or hard liquor and gambling.
Ans: (d) They become addicts to coffee or hard l iquor and gambling.

Q12. The syllabus–loaded education system
(a) places a heavy burden on the youth.
(b) ensures that parents pay attention to the development of children.
(c) lays emphasis on intelligence.
(d) gives students a lot of free time.
Ans: (a) Places a heavy burden on the youth

Q13. The author thinks that
(a) authorities are more appreciative of the syllabus– loaded education system.
(b) hobbies play an important role in changing the unfortunate situation.
(c) cocurricular activities are discouraged.
(d) only Indians suffer from inability to utilise leisure.
Ans: (b) Hobbies play an important role in changing the unfortunate situation.

Q14. The passage tells us that
(a) hobbies are a waste of time
(b) hobbies play a crucial role in physical and mental development.
(c) hobbies wreak havoc on man’s health and happiness.
(d) hobbies can turn us into addicts of coffee, liquor or gambling.
Ans: (b) Hobbies play a crucial role in physical and mental development.
Directions: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. In general it is better to use too little makeup than too much. The audience should not be aware that the actor’s face is painted. For the actor who is playing his own age, the artist uses makeup to strengthen the features, particularly eyes and mouth, and to add lifelike colour to the face. Character makeup does these things in addition to transforming the face to another age, another type or another race. This transformation, particularly for young actors playing old characters, can be helped greatly by hats and hairdos. Makeup consists of applying a base colour, then modelling the face by highlighting and shadowing (sinking the cheeks, for example, with a darker colour). Sometimes, modelling is done by applying false (putty or plastic) noses, enlarged eyebrows, or scars. Lines to suggest wrinkles are drawn on with a dark makeup pencil (brown or maroon, not black) or brush. Each line is highlighted with another line, either white or a light tint of the base colour. Lips are outlined and coloured, and a similar colour is applied to the cheeks. After makeup is complete, powder is applied.

Q15. The artist uses makeup to strengthen the features, particularly eyes and mouth, and to add life like colours to the face for the actor who is playing ___ .
(a) the lead role (b) the old man or woman
(c) his own age (d) the role of the clown
Ans: (c) his own age.

Q16. What do artists use to help young actors playing old men?
(a) Wig and moustache
(b) Hats and hairdos
(c) Wheel chairs and walking sticks
(d) False noses, enlarged eyebrows or scars
Ans: (b) Hats and hairdos.

Q17. What is the correct sequence for makeup?
(a) Modelling the face by highlighting and shadowing then applying a base colour
(b) Highlighting and shadowing, then applying a base colour and modelling the face
(c) Applying a base colour, then modelling the face by highlighting and shadowing
(d) Shadowing and modelling, then applying a base colour for highlighting
Ans: (c) Applying a base colour, then modelling the face by highlighting and shadowing.

Q18. Lines are drawn with a dark makeup pencil or brush to suggest _____ .
(a) dimples (b) wrinkles
(c) smiles (d) pimples
Ans: (b)wrinkles

Q19. When is powder usually applied ?
(a) Before the makeup
(b) As makeup foundation
(c) After the makeup
(d) During the makeup
Ans:
(c) After the makeup.
Directions: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. Without breakfast, all of us (irrespective of age) are likely to experience the late morning slump; tiredness, sleepiness and the urge to sit back. Our efficiency goes down further as the day progresses.Moreover, skipping the first meal of the day leads to intense hunger pangs by late morning and we end up eating chips, samosas, burgers or other highfat unhealthy foods. Breakfastskippers are more likely to be overweight. A good breakfast leads to a more active, productive day. Research has found a definite connection between skipping breakfast and memory impairment in both young and older adults. Moreover, breakfast is directly linked with performance in school and college. Breakfast should contribute at least onefourth of our daily requirement of nutrients. An ideal breakfast should contain adequate amounts of carbohydrates, proteins and fats in addition to minerals and vitamins. Essentially this means including most of our food groups in the morning meal. Whole grain cerealslike atta in parathas and puris, dalia, suji, etc. are an integral part of the traditional Indian breakfast. Their high fibre and protein content provides a feeling of satisfaction, which lowers the urge to snack before lunch. On the other hand, highsugar foods actually make people sleepier, not active. Milk, cheese, eggs or dals (as sprouts in idli or dosas or as sambhar) are other protein sources. A serving of milk (one cup) provides Bcomplex vitamins and also minerals like zinc, magnesium and calcium. Fruits or vegetables provide valuable vitamin C and keep constipation away.

Q20. We experience sleepiness in the morning because
(a) we eat breakfast. (b) we miss breakfast.
(c) efficiency goes down.
(d) we feel tired and sleepy.
Ans: (b) we miss breakfast.

Q21. We eat unhealthy food when
(a) we suffer from hunger.
(b) we have become overweight.
(c) we have skipped the first meal.
(d) we love chips, burgers etc.
Ans: (c) we have skipped the first meal.

Q22. A good breakfast
(a) keeps you active.
(b) causes memory loss.
(c) boosts performance.
(d) keeps you active; boosts performance.
Ans: (d) keeps you active; boosts performance.

Q23. An ideal breakfast should contain
(a) carbohydrates, proteins, fats, minerals and vitamins.
(b) some food groups.
(c) only high fibre and protein.
(d) foods of our choice.
Ans: (a) carbohydrates, proteins, fats, minerals and vitamins.

Q24. Breakfast is satisfying when
(a) it is rich in fatty foods.
(b) it contains high protein and fibre content.
(c) it is rich in carbohydrates, proteins and fats.
(d) we eat to our heart’s content.
Ans: (b) it contains high protein and fibre content.
Directions: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. Another marvel on the far side of the lake was a little farm that felt like a secret in the city. Some of the gaunt Karnataka labourers even looked away when children came to dig and eat. But the greatest pleasure, this side of the lake, was the jamun tree. A few months back, Kalu and Sunil had a feast in the branches, shaking down a few berries for Mirchi. That’s when they came to know the second coolest thing about the jamun tree: There were parrots nesting in it. Since then, some other road boys had been capturing the parrots one by one to sell at the Marol Market, but Sunil had brought Kalu around to the belief that the birds should be left as they were. Sunil listened for their squawks each morning, to make sure they hadn’t been abducted in the night. Kalu’s expertise was in the recycling bins inside airline catering compounds. Private waste collectors emptied these dumpsters on a regular basis, but Kalu had mastered the trash truck’s schedules. The night before pickup, Kalu would climb over the barbed wire fences and raid the overflowing bins. Kalu’s routine had become known by the local police, however. He kept getting caught, until some constables proposed a different arrangement. Kalu could keep his metal scrap if he’d pass on information he picked up on the road about local drug dealers. MEANINGS OF DIFFICULT WORDS/PHRASES (a) gaunt (Adj.): very thin especially from disease/ hunger/cold (b) squawks (N.): the noise of birds (c) abducted (V.): kidnapped (d) dumpsters (N.): a container designed to receive and transport dump waste

Q25. What was the greatest pleasure this side of the lake?
(a) A secret farm.
(b) The Jamun tree.
(c) Feasting on the branches of the Jamun tree.
(d) Labourers looking away when the children came to dig and eat.
Ans: (b) The Jamun tree

Q26. What was the second coolest thing about the Jamun tree?
(a) Shaking down the berries for Mirchi.
(b) There were parrots nesting in the tree.
(c) Selling parrots in the Marol Market.
(d) Capturing parrots in the tree.
Ans: (b) There were parrots nesting in the tree.

Q27. What did Sunil think of parrots?
(a) That they should be captured and sold.
(b) That they had been abducted in the night.
(c) That they should not be captured and sold.
(d) That they squawked every morning.
Ans: (c) That they should not be captured and sold.

Q28. How did Kalu manage to raid the airline recycling bins before they were emptied?
(a) He was an expert.
(b) He jumped over the barbed wire fences.
(c) He had mastered the trash trucks schedules.
(d) He worked at night.
Ans: (c) He had mastered the trash trucks schedules.

Q29. Why was a different arrangement proposed?
(a) Because Kalu’s routine was known by the police.
(b) So that Kalu would be able to keep his metal scrap.
(c) So that Kalu could pass on information about local drug dealers
(d) Because Kalu kept getting caught
Ans:
(c) So that Kalu could pass on information about local drug dealers.

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