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Part 408 – Reading Comprehension Previous Year Questions

PASSAGE – II International trade represents a significant share of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). While international trade has been present throughout much of history, its economic, social and political importance has been on the rise in recent centuries. Industrialization, advances in tecnology, transportation, globalization, multinational corporations, and outsourcing are all having a major impact on the international trade system. Increasing international trade is crucial to the continuance of globalization. International trade is, in principle, not different from domestic as the motivation and the behaviour of parties is across a border or not. The main difference is that international trade. Another difference between domestic and international trade is that factors of production such as capital and labour are typically more mobile within a country than across countries.

Q1. Which of the following is one of the factors of production ?
(a) Capital (b) Cost
(c) Profit (d) Loss
Ans: (a) Capital

Q2. What is the synonym of mobile ?
(a) Versatile (b) Moveable
(c) Changeable (d) Transferable
Ans: (b) Moveable

Q3. Which one of the following has a major impact on international trade ?
(a) Contribution to GDP (b) Industrialization
(c) Outsourcing (d) Domestic trade
Ans: (b) Industrialization

Q4. According to the author, increasing international trade
(a) brings about speedy industrialization
(b) uplifts technology and transportation
(c) is crucial to the continuance of globalization
(d) encourages multinational corporations
Ans: (c) is crucial to the continuance of globalization

Q5. What is the main difference between international and domestic trade ?
(a) One is more significant than the other
(b) One is more costly than the other
(c) One is more advanced than the other
(d) One is more crucial than the other
Ans:
(b) One is more costly than the other
Directions: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. (Passage – I Poverty can be defined as a social phenomenon in which a section of the society is unable to fulfill even its basic necessities of life. When a substantial segment of the society is deprived of the minimum level of living and continues at a bare subsistence level, that society is said to be plagued with mass poverty. The countries of the third world exhibit invariably the existence of mass poverty, although pockets of poverty exist even in the developed countries of Europe and America. Attempts have been made in all societies to define poverty, but all of them are conditioned by the vision of minimum or good life obtaining in society. For instance, the concept of poverty in the U.S.A. would be significantly different from that in India because the average man is able to afford a much higher level of living in the United States. There is an effort in all definitions of poverty to approach the average level of living in a society and as such these definitions reflect the coexistence of inequalities in a society and the extent to which different societies are prepared to tolerate them. For instance, in India, the generally accepted definition of poverty emphasizes minimum level of living rather than a reasonable level of living. This attitude is borne out of a realization that it would not be possible to provide even a minimum quantum of basic needs for some decades and therefore, to talk about a reasonable level of living or good life may appear to be wishful thinking at the present stage. Thus, political considerations enter the definitions of poverty because programmes of alleviating poverty may become prohibitive as the vision of a good life widens.

Q6. What is poverty according to the writer?
(a) Ability to consider it as social phenomenon of a substantial segment of society.
(b) Inability of a society to provide the basic necessities of life.
(c) A political compulsion that dictates economic policies.
(d) A form of exhibition of subsistence living.
Ans: (b) Inability of a society to provide the basic necessities of life.

Q7. What conditions the various attempts to define poverty ?
(a) The definition of poverty in India
(b) The definition of poverty in the USA
(c) The vision of minimum or good life
(d) Political considerations
Ans: (c) The vision of minimum or good life

Q8. What do all definitions of poverty do ?
(a) Reflect coexistence of inequalities in society.
(b) Societies tolerance of inequalities.
(c) Approach the average level of living in a society.
(d) Minimum level of living in India.
Ans: (a) Reflect coexistence of inequalities in society.

Q9. Definition of poverty in India emphasizes minimum level of living because
(a) it is impossible at this stage to provide a reasonable quantum of living.
(b) political considerations enter the definitions of poverty,
(c) there is a reasonable level of good living.
(d) programmes of alleviation of poverty have been initiated.
Ans: (a) It is impossible at this stage to provide a reasonable quantum of living.

Q10. Societies in the third world can be characterised plagued by mass poverty, because
(a) Europe and America have pockets of poverty.
(b) poverty is a mass social phenomenon.
(c) there is a wide variation in the definition of poverty.
(d) societies live at a bare subsistence level.
Ans: (d) Societies live at a bare subsistence level.
Passage – II By the midnineteenth century, mass production of paper patterns, the emergence of the home sewing machine, and the convenience of mail order catalogues brought fashionable clothing into the American home. By the early twentieth century, home economists working in extension and outreach programs taught women how to use paper patterns to improve the fit and efficiency to new garments as well as how to update existing ones. Teachers of home economics traditionally made home sewing a critical part of their curriculum, emphasizing selfsufficiency and resource fulness for young women. However, with the increasing availability of massproduced clothing in catalogues and department stores, more and more women preferred buying garments to making them. As a result, home economists shifted their attention to consumer education. Through field study’s analysis and research, they became experts on the purchase and preservation of readyto wear clothing for the family, offering budgeting instruction targeted at adolescent girls. Modern home sewing made it possible for American women to transcend their economic differences and geographic locations with clothing that was increasingly standardized. The democratization of fashion continued through the twentieth century as the readytowear market expanded and home sewing became more of a pastime than a necessity.

Q11. What were the skills that were emphasized for young women ?
(a) Self confidence and selfesteem
(b) Selfsufficiency and resourcefulness
(c) Resourcefulness and selfconfidence
(d) Prudence and resourcefulness
Ans: (b) Selfsufficiency and resourcefulness

Q12. Who became experts on the purchase and preservation of readytowear clothing for the family ?
(a) Owners of department stores
(b) Fieldstudy analysts
(c) Young women
(d) Teachers of home economics
Ans: (d) Teachers of home economics

Q13. Who was the target group ?
(a) Young women (b) Young girls
(c) Adolescent girls (d) Working women
Ans: (c) Adolescent girls

Q14. How did home sewing help American women ?
(a) They became field analysts and researchers.
(b) They went beyond economic boundaries.
(c) They found good jobs.
(d) They became excellent teachers.
Ans: (b) They went beyond economic boundaries.

Q15. What improved the fit and efficiency of new garments?
(a) Sewing machines (b) Economists
(c) Mass production (d) Paper patterns
Ans:
(d)Paper patterns
Directions: In the following questions, you have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. (PASSAGE–I A crucial element that defines the soap opera is the open ended nature of the narrative, with stories spanning several episodes. One of the defining features that makes a television program a soap opera, according to Albert Moran is “that form of television that works with a continuous open narrative. Each episode ends with a promise that the storyline is to be continued in another episode.” In 2012, Robert Lloyd of the Los Angeles Times wrote of daily dramas, “Although melodramatically eventful, soap operas such as this also have a luxury of space that makes them seem more naturalistic, indeed, the economics of the form demand long scenes, and conversations that a 22 episodesperseason weekly series might dispense with in half a dozen lines of dialogue may be drawn out, as here, for pages. You spend more time even with the minor characters, the apparent villains grow less apparently villainous.” Soap opera storylines run concurrently, intersect and lead into further developments. An individual episode of a soap opera will generally switch between several different concurrent narrative threads that may at times interconnect and effect one another or may run entirely independent of each other. Evening soap operas and serials that run for only a part of the year tend to bring things to a dramatic end of season cliffhanger.

Q16. A soap opera has the space for it to be more
(a) artistic (b) naturalistic
(c) dramatic (d) tragic
Ans: (b)naturalistic

Q17. The economics of a soap opera form demands for it to have
(a) long scenes (b) luxurious space
(c) melodramatic events (d) promising storylines
Ans: (a)long scenes

Q18. An individual episode of a soap opera generally switches between
(a) more time spent with minor charaters.
(b) apparent villains that grow less apparent villainous.
(c) successive intersections of events.
(d) different concurrent narrative threads.
Ans: (d)different concurrent narrative threads.

Q19. Soap operas that run for a part of the year usually end in
(a) a cliff (b) an episode
(c) a cliffhanger (d) a sequence
Ans: (c) a cliffhanger

Q20. What does the author mean by the open – ended nature of soap operas ?
(a) Each episode ends with a promise that the storyline is to be continued in another episode
(b) Every episode has a different story
(c) Every episode ends abruptly
(d) Consecutive episodes have no connection
Ans:
(a) Each episode ends with a promise that the storyline is to be continued in another episode
PASSAGE–II Two or three days and nights went by; I reckon I might say they swum by, they slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely. Here is the way we put it in the time. It was a monstrous big river down there – sometimes a mile and a half wide; we ran nights, and laid up and hid daytimes; soon as night was most gone we stopped navigating and tied up – nearly always in the dead water under a towhead; and then cut young cottonwoods and willows, and hid the raft with them. Then we set out the lines. Next we slid into the river and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool off; then we set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep and watched the daylight come. Not a sound anywhere – perfectly still – just like the whole world was asleep; only sometimes the bullfrog’s cluttering, maybe. The first thing to see, looking away over the water was a kind of dull line – that was the woods on the other side; you couldn’t make anything else out; then a pale place in the sky; then more paleness spreading around; then the river softened up, away off, and wasn’t black any more, but grey; you could see little dark spots drifting alongever so far away – trading scows and such things and long black streaks – rafts; sometimes you could hear a sweep creaking or jumbled up voices, it was so still and sounds come so far and by and by you could see a streak on the water which you know by the look of the streak that there’s a snag there in a swift current which breaks on it and makes that streak look that way.

Q21. They stopped navigating
(a) at night (b) at dusk
(c) at daytime (d) at dawn
Ans: (a) at night

Q22. After a swim in the moor they
(a) set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about ankle deep and watched the daylight come.
(b) set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep and watched the daylight come.
(c) set down on the sandy shore and watched the daylight come.
(d) set down on the sandy bottom and watched the daylight come.
Ans: (b) set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep and watched the daylight come.

Q23. In the stillness of the night
(a) sounds come so far
(b) the bullfrogs also were asleep
(c) the whole world was asleep
(d) a sweep creaking or jumbled up voices could be heard
Ans: (c) the whole world was asleep

Q24. The streak on the water looks as it does because
(a) the swift current has broken the streak
(b) the streak has been swept by the swift current to the shore.
(c) of a snag there in the swift current which breaks on it.
(d) the streak has been swept by the swift current.
Ans: (c) of a snag there in the swift current which breaks on it.

Q25. How did the days and nights go by, according to the writer ?
(a) They slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely.
(b) They slid along so smooth and quietly.
(c) They slid along so smooth and soft and quietly.
(d) They slid along so quietly and smooth and softly.
Ans: (a) They slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely.

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