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Part 402 – Reading Comprehension Previous Year Questions

PASSAGEII Why don’t I have a telephone? Not because I pretend to be wise or pose as unusual. There are two chief reasons; because I don’t really like the telephone, and because I find I can still work and play, eat, breathe, and sleep without it. Why don’t I like the telephone? Because I think it is a pest and time waster. It may create unnecessary suspense and anxiety, as when you wait for an expected call, that doesn’t come; or irritating delay, as when you keep ringing a number that is always engaged. As for speaking in a public telephone booth, it seems to me really horrible. You would not use it unless you were in a hurry, and because you are in a hurry, you will find other people waiting before you. When you do get into the booth, you are half suffocated by the stale, unventilated air, flavoured with cheap facepowder and chain smoking; and by the time you have begun your conversation your back is chilled by the cold looks of somebody who is moving about restlessly to take your place. If you have a telephone in your house, you will admit that it tends to ring when you least want it to ring; when you are asleep, or in the middle of a meal or a conversation, or when you are just going out, or when you are in your bath. Are you strong minded enough to ignore it, to say to yourself. “Ah well, it will be all the same in hundred years time”. You are not. You think there may be some important news or message for you. Have you never rushed dripping from the bath, of chewing from the table, or dazed from bed, only to be told that you are a wrong number? You were told the truth. In my opinion all telephone numbers are wrong numbers. If, of course, your telephone rings and you decide not to answer it, then you will have to listen to an idiotic bell ringing and ringing in what is supposed to be the privacy of your own home. You might as well buy a bicycle bell and ring it yourself.

Q1. The author does not have a telephone because
(a) he poses as unusual.
(b) he would prefer to do something else.
(c) he thinks that it can create unnecessary suspense and anxiety.
(d) he pretends to be wise.
Ans: (c) he thinks that it can create unnecessary suspense and anxiety.

Q2. …… your back is chilled by the cold looks of somebody means
(a) you feel cold at the back.
(b) you feel uneasy because the person next in the queue looks at you restlessly.
(c) people are very cold.
(d) others look at you angrily.
Ans: (b) you feel uneasy because the person next in the queue looks at you restlessly

Q3. All telephone numbers are wrong numbers, because
(a) the author always gets wrong calls.
(b) whenever he tries it always goes wrong.
(c) he doesn’t give much importance to telephone and telephone numbers.
(d) None of the statements given above.
Ans: (d) None of the statements given above.

Q4. Ah well, it will be all the same in hundred years time. This sentence means
(a) things have not changed for the past 100 years.
(b) things will remain the same for 100 years to come.
(c) one should be strong minded.
(d) nothing is going to change even if you don’t answer the telephone bell.
Ans: (d) Nothing is going to change even if you don’t answer the telephone bell.

Q5. He hates speaking in a public telephone booth because
(a) he is suffocated by the stale, unventilated air, flavoured with cheap face powder and chainsmoking.
(b) others look at him angrily.
(c) the other side may not know your number.
(d) it is costlier.
Ans: (a) he is suffocated by the stale, unventilated air, flavoured with cheap face powder and chainsmoking.
Directions: You have two passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGEI Pidgins are languages that are not, acquired as mother tongues and that are used for a restricted set of communicative functions. They are formed from a mixture of languages and have a limited vocabulary and a simplified grammar. Pidgins serve as a means of communication between speakers of mutually unintelligible languages and may become essential, in multilingual areas. A Creole develops from a pidgin when the pidgin becomes the mother tongue of the community. To cope with the consequent expansion of communicative functions the vocabulary is increased and the grammar becomes more complex. Where a Creole and the standard variety of English coexist, as in the Carribbean, there is a continuum from the most extreme form of Creole to the form that is closest to the standard language. Linguists mark off the relative positions on the Creole continuum as the ‘basilect’ (the furthest from the standard language), the ‘mesolect’, and the ‘acrolet’. In such situations, most Creole speakers can vary their speech along the continuum and many are also competent in the standard English of their country.

Q6. A pidgin develops in a situation when
(a) different and mutually unintelligible languages exist side by side.
(b) a Creole becomes the mother tongue of a linguistic community.
(c) a language with restricted vocabulary undergoes an expansion in grammar and vocabulary.
(d) two similar languages are mixed to create a new language.
Ans: (a) different and mutually unintelligible languages exist side by side

Q7. According to the given passage a pidgin becomes a Creole when
(a) it ceases to be a means of communication
(b) it becomes the mother tongue for a new generation of speakers
(c) its vocabulary undergoes some kind of change
(d) two or more languages are mixed with an existing pidgin
Ans: (b) it becomes the mother tongue for a new generation of speakers

Q8. According to the passage, a Creole continuum is
(a) a linguistic term for the mixture of more than two languages.
(b) a scale which measures the linguistic competence of the speaker.
(c) a scale in which the proximity of the Creole to the standard language is measured.
(d) a record of the continuous history of a Creole.
Ans: (c) a scale in which the proximity of the Creole to the standard language is measured

Q9. According to the passage basilect means
(a) an impure form of a Creole.
(b) a form of Creole which is furthest from the standard language.
(c) a form of creole which has an extended vocabulary.
(d) a form of creole which is very close to the standard language.
Ans: (b) a form of Creole which is furthest from the standard language

Q10. Find out a word in the passage which is opposite in meaning to the word – Simplified
(a) Complex (b) Expansion
(c) Restricted (d) Consequent
Ans:
(a) Complex
PASSAGEII There were four of us – George, and William Samuel Harris, and myself, and Montmorency. We were sitting in my room, smoking and talking about “how bad we were bad from a medical point of view I mean, of course. We were all feeling seedy, and we were getting quite nervous about it. Harris said he felt such extraordinary fits of giddiness come over him at times, that he hardly knew what he was doing; and then George said that he had fits of giddiness too, and hardly knew what he was doing. With me, it was my liver that was out of order. I knew it was my liver that was out of order, because I had just been reading a patent liverpill circular, in which were detailed the various symptoms by which a man could tell when his liver was out of order. I had them all. It is a most extraordinary thing, but I never read a patent medicine advertisement without being impelled to the conclusion that I am suffering from the particular disease therein dealt with in its most virulent form. The diagnosis seems in every case to correspond exactly with all the sensations that I have ever felt.

Q11. The four felt down and out because
(a) the room was too smoky
(b) they could never read a patent medicine advertisement.
(c) they thought they were ill.
(d) they had experienced a most extraordinary thing.
Ans: (c) they thought they were ill

Q12. Whenever the speaker read a liver pill circular
(a) he suffered from an extraordinary surge of giddiness.
(b) he felt sure that he had a liver disorder.
(c) he felt the urge to smoke.
(d) All of the above.
Ans: (b) he felt sure that he had a liver disorder

Q13. The author of the above passage seems to be suffering from
(a) fits of morbid depression without real cause.
(b) an abnormal anxiety about his health.
(c) melancholia.
(d) an unnecessarily dark, gloomy and pessimistic attitude to life.
Ans: (d) an unnecessarily dark, gloomy and pessimistic attitude to life

Q14. Harris was troubled by
(a) symptom of vertigo. (b) garrulity.
(c) tribulation. (d) frailty.
Ans: (a) symptom of vertigo

Q15. The word which is closest in meaning to virulent is
(a) fantastic (b) vital
(c) viral (d) hostile
Ans:
(d) hostile
Directions: You have a passage with 10 questions Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. (SSC Graduate Level TierI Exam. 19.05.2013) Many people who are looking to get a pet dog get a puppy. There are many reasons why people get puppies. After all, puppies are cute, friendly, and playful. But even though puppies make good pets, there are good reasons why you should consider getting an adult dog instead. When you get a puppy, you have to teach it how to behave. You have to make sure that the puppy is housebroken so that it does not go to the bathroom inside the house. You have to teach the puppy, not to jump up on your guests or chew on your shoes. You have to train the puppy to walk on a leash. This is a lot of work. On the other hand, when you get an adult dog there is a good chance that it will already know how to do all of the previously mentioned things. Many adult dogs have already been housebroken. Many adult dogs will not jump on or chew things that you do not want them to jump on or chew. Many adult dogs will be able to walk on a leash without pulling you to the other side of the street. Puppies also have a lot of energy and want to play all of the time. This can be fun, but you might not want to play as much as your puppy does. Puppies will not always sleep through the night or let you relax as you watch television. On the other hand, most adult dogs will wait on you to play. What is more, they will sleep when you are sleeping and are happy to watch television on the couch right beside you. There is one last reason why you should get an adult dog instead of a puppy. When most people go to the pound to get a dog, they get a puppy. This means that many adult dogs spend a lot of time in the pound and some never find good homes. So if you are looking to get a dog for a pet, you should think about getting an adult dog. They are good pets who need good homes.

Q16. Which is the best example of a dog that is housebroken ?
(a) Muffin chews on people’s shoes.
(b) Spot goes outside to use the bathroom.
(c) Rex always breaks things inside the house.
(d) Rover never jumps on guests.
Ans: (b) Spot goes outside to use the bathroom

Q17. The author apparently thinks that puppies are
(a) not as playful as adult dogs.
(b) hardworking.
(c) friendly and playful.
(d) not as cute as adult dogs.
Ans: (c) friendly and playful

Q18. Which is the best synonym for behave as applicable to this passage?
(a) act (b) listen
(c) understand (d) train
Ans: (a) act

Q19. The passage speaks of
(a) the work involved in training puppies.
(b) the immature acts of puppies.
(c) how puppies do not make good pets.
(d) how puppies can be very destructive.
Ans: (b) the immature acts of puppies

Q20. As used in paragraph 3, which is the best synonym for relax ?
(a) rest (b) work
(c) leave (d) play
Ans: (a) rest

Q21. The author begins paragraphs 2 and 4 with the phrase, On the other hand. This phrase is used to
(a) support the following paragraph.
(b) highlight an example.
(c) contradict previous information.
(d) contradict a later statement.
Ans: (c) contradict previous information

Q22. In the final paragraph, the author says many adult dogs spend a lot of time in the pound, and some never find good homes. Based on the passage, why is this most likely?
(a) People do not want to get a dog that does not have much time left to live.
(b) People see adult dogs as unhappy and dangerous, while they see puppies as cute and friendly.
(c) People understand that most adult dogs still need a lot of training before they understand how to behave properly.
(d) People think that puppies are cute and playful and do not always think about how much work it will take to train them.
Ans: (d) People think that puppies are cute and playful and do not always think about how much work it will take to train them

Q23. Based on the information in the passage, it can be understood that someone who owns a puppy must be very
(a) responsible (b) strict.
(c) serious. (d) optimistic.
Ans: (a) responsible

Q24. According to the passage, why is it easier to take care of adult dogs than puppies? I. Puppies need to learn how to walk well on a leash. II. Adult dogs have less energy than puppies. III. It is harder for adult dogs to find a home than it is for puppies.
(a) I, II and III (b) I only
(c) I and II only (d) II and III only
Ans: (a) I, II and III

Q25. Based on the information in the passage, which of the following statements is false ?
(a) Adult dogs do not need to eat very much.
(b) Puppies have a lot of energy.
(c) Puppies need a lot of attention.
(d) Adult dogs do not like to play.
Ans: (a) Adult dogs do not need to eat very much.
Directions: You have two passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
Passage -I The Great Pyramid at Giza is one of the world’s most amazing landmarks. Rising high above the Sahara Desert in the Giza region of northern Egypt, the Great Pyramid stands some 450 feet into the burning desert sky and occupies an area of 13 acres. The rough climate of the Sahara has actually caused the pyramid to shrink 30 feet from its original height. The pyramid was such an amazing feat of engineering, that it remained the tallest structure in the world for over 3,800 years The entire pyramid was originally faced with polished limestone to make it shine brilliantly in the sun. Most Egyptologists, scientists who study ancient Egypt, agree that the Great Pyramid was built around 2560 BC, a little more than 4,500 years ago. It took tens of thousands of workers twenty years to build. The pyramid contains over two million stone blocks. Although most of the blocks weigh two or three tons, some weigh up to 80 tons The Great Pyramid of Giza was ordered built by the Pharaoh Khufu as a magnificent tomb. His vizier (advisor) Hemon is credited with being the pyramid’s architect. Khufu’s pyramid is actually part of a complex of pyramids that includes the Pyramid of Khafre, the smaller Pyramid of Menkaure, a variety of smaller pyramids and structures, and the Great Sphinx. The Great Pyramid of Giza is the last remaining of the Seven Wonders of the World.

Q26. Which of these does not house the Great Pyramid ?
(a) Giza. (b) Southern Egypt.
(c) Northern Egypt. (d) Sahara Desert.
Ans: (b) Southern Egypt

Q27. How many stone blocks constitute the pyramid ?
(a) 4,500. (b) more than two million.
(c) 3,800. (d) 2,560. (b) more than two million

Q28. Most of the blocks in the pyramid weigh about ……… tons.
(a) five (b) eighty
(c) two or three (d) 4,500
Ans: (c) two or three

Q29. Which of the following definitions best describes the meaning of “complex” in the passage?
(a) Pyramid. (b) Materials.
(c) Group. (d) Army.
Ans: (c) Group

Q30. Which of the following is false?
(a) The Great Pyramid is the last of the Seven Wonders of the World.
(b) Khufu was Hemon’s vizier and architect.
(c) The Pyramid took tens of thousands of workers about twenty years to complete it.
(d) Hemon was Khufu’s vizier and architect.
Ans: (b) Khufu was Hemon’s vizier and architect.

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