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Part 401 – Reading Comprehension Previous Year Questions

PASSAGE – III Women’s education in India is one of the foremost concerns of the Government of India as well as of the society at large. It is due to the fact that at the present time, the educated women play a very significant role in overall development and progress of the country. Women hold a prominent position in the Indian society and all over the world. However, since the prehistoric times women were denied opportunities and had to suffer for the hegemonic masculine ideology. This unjustifiable and unwarrantable oppression had resulted into a movement that fought to achieve the equal status ofwomen all over the world. Women’s education in India is the consequence of such progress and this led to the tremendous improvement of women’s condition throughout the world. Nevertheless eradication of female illiteracy is considered as a major concern today. In the present era, the Indian society has established a number of institutions for the educational development of women and girls. These educational institutions aim for immense help and are concerned with the development of women. In the modern society, women in India have come a long way. Indian women are at par with men in all kinds of tasks like reaching the moon, conquering Mount Everest, and participating in all fields. Ail this is possible just because of education and the profound impact it has had on women.

Q1. Education for women is necessary
(a) to enable more women to conquer Mt. Everest.
(b) to usher in a modem and progressive society.
(c) to protest against masculine supremacy.
(d) to establish more educational institutions.
Ans: (b) to usher in a modem and progressive society.

Q2. In present times, education for women is not at par with that of their male counterparts because
(a) Indian women did not join the worldwide movement to gain equal status for themselves.
(b) female illiteracy is a major social problem.
(c) Indian women are traditionally more preoccupied with their household duties.
(d) ours is a male dominated society,
Ans: (d) ours is a male dominated society,

Q3. …….. has been a major boost for female literacy in India today.
(a) The global movement to gain equal status for women
(b) The modern governmental system
(c) Increase in the number of broadminded men
(d) Increase in the number of women in prominent positions
Ans: (a) The global movement to gain equal status for women

Q4. Progress and improvement in education for women has enabled them to
(a) overthrow male hegemony.
(b) bag coveted positions for themselves.
(c) create an impact on all aspects of life.
(d) All of the above.
Ans: (d) All of the above

Q5. Find the option opposite in meaning to unjustifiable.
(a) compulsory (b) progressive
(c) reasonable (d) methodical
Ans:
(c) reasonable
Directions: You have two passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGEI The Bengal Renaissance refers to a social reform movement during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in the region of Bengal in Undivided India during the period of British rule. The Bengal renaissance can be said to have started with Raja Ram Mohan Roy (1775-1833) and ended with Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), although there have been many stalwarts thereafter embodying particular aspects of the unique intellectual and creative output. Nineteenth century Bengal was a unique blend of religious and social reformers, scholars, literary giants, journalists, patriotic orators and scientists, all merging to form the image of a renaissance, and marked the transition from the ‘medieval’ to the ‘modern’. During this period, Bengal witnessed an intellectual awakening that is in some way similar to the European Renaissance during the 16th century, although Europeans of that age were not confronted with the challenge and influence of alien colonialism. This movement questioned existing orthodoxies, particularly with respect to women, marriage, the dowry system, the caste system and religion. One of the earliest social movements that emerged during this time was the Young Bengal movement, that espoused rationalism and atheism as the common denominators of civil conduct among upper caste educated Hindus. The parallel socio- religious movement, the Brahmo Samaj, developed during this time period and counted many of the leaders of the Bengal Renaissance among its followers.

Q6. Find the option that is opposite in meaning to alien.
(a) disputable (b) indigenous
(c) unethical (d) unscientific
Ans: (b) indigenous

Q7. The Bengal Renaissance was different from the 16th century European Renaissance because
(a) Europeans did not have the dowry system.
(b) Raja Rammohan Roy and Tagore were not born in the 16th century.
(c) The Bengal Renaissance was an essentially Hindu Movement.
(d) Unlike the Bengalis, Europeans were not under foreign rule.
Ans: (d) Unlike the Bengalis, Europeans were not under foreign rule.

Q8. The spirit of Renaissance
(a) is to embrace atheism.
(b) is to get inspiration from Westernintellectual thought.
(c) lies in breaking all shackles of backwardness and narrow mindedness.
(d) is essentially scientific.
Ans: (c) lies in breaking all shackles of backwardness and narrow mindedness

Q9. The Bengal Renaissance movement
(a) wanted to overthrow colonialism.
(b) wanted to propagate Brahmoism.
(c) wanted social reform to improve the lot of the weak and the downtrodden.
(d) None of the above.
Ans: (c) wanted social reform to improve the lot of the weak and the downtrodden

Q10. The Bengal Renaissance gathered momentum in the 19th century because
(a) the British had colonised India.
(b) there was an abundance of intellectual and creative activities in Bengal then.
(c) the Brahmo Samai was formed.
(d) Raja Rammohan Roy and Tagore lived at that time.
Ans: (b) there was an abundance of intellectual and creative activities in Bengal then.
PASSAGEII “I must find a hiding place,” he thought, “and in the next few seconds or 1 am done for.” Scarcely had the thought crossed his mind that the lane took a sudden turning so that he found himself hidden from his pursuers. There are circumstances in which the least energetic of mankind learn to act with speed and decision. This was such an occasion for Rehmat Ali and those who knew him best would have been the most astonished at the lad’s boldness. He stopped dead, threw the box or jewellery over a garden wall and, leaping upwards with incredible lightness, he seized the top of the walls with his hands and tumbled headlong into the garden.

Q11. Rehmat All is most likely
(a) a burglar. (b) a policeman.
(c) a night watchman. (d) a jogger.
Ans: (a) a burglar

Q12. What kind of a person was Rehmat Ali originally ?
(a) slow and steady. (b) lazy and indecisive.
(c) reflective in nature. (d) bold and decisive.
Ans: (b) lazy and indecisive

Q13. The expression to stop dead means
(a) to be paralysed. (b) to come to a complete halt.
(c) to die suddenly. (d) be close to death.
Ans: (b) to come to a complete halt

Q14. Rehmat Ali found himself hidden from his pursuers because
(a) he had gone around an unexpected bend.
(b) his pursuers could not run fast enough.
(c) he had stopped dead.
(d) he had acted with speed and decision.
Ans: (a) he had gone around an unexpected bend

Q15. There are circumstances in which the least energetic of mankind, learn to act with speed and decision, (and the most cautious forget their care) Rehmat illustrates this by
(a) running away from his pursuers.
(b) by stopping dead.
(c) turning into a lane.
(d) jumping into the garden.
Ans: (d) jumping into the garden
Directions: You have a passage with 10 questions. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. CYBER BOGEYS The cyberworld is ultimately ungovernable. This is alarming as well as convenient; sometimes, convenient because alarming. Some Indian politicians use this to great advantage. When there is an obvious failure in governance during a crisis they deflect attention from their own incompetence towards the ungovernable. So, having failed to prevent nervous citizens from fleeing their cities of work by assuring them of proper protection, some national leaders are now busy trying to prove to one another, and to panicprone Indians, that a mischievous neighbour has been using the internet and social networking sites to spread dangerous rumours. And the Centre’s automatic reaction is to start blocking these sites and begin elaborate and potentially endless negotiations with Google, Twitter and Facebook about access to information. If this is the official idea of prompt action at a time of crisis among communities, then Indians have more reason to fear their protectors than the nebulous mischiefmakers of the cyberworld. Wasting time gathering proof, blocking vaguely suspicious websites, hurling accusations across the border and worrying about bilateral relations are ways of keeping busy with inessentials because one does not quite know what to do about the essentials of a difficult situation. Besides, only a fifth of the 245 websites blocked by the Centre mention the people of the Northeast or the violence in Assam. And if a few morphed images and spurious texts can unsettle an entire nation, then there is something deeply wrong with the nation and with how it is being governed. This is what its leaders should be addressing immediately, rather than making a wrongheaded display of their powers of censorship. It is just as absurd, and part of the same syndrome to try to ban Twitter accounts that parody despatches from the Prime Minister’s Office. To describe such forms of humour and dissent as “misrepresenting” the PMO — as if Twitterers would take these parodies for genuine despatches from the PMO — makes the PMO look more ridiculous than its parodists manage to. With the precedent for such action set recently by the chief minister of West Bengal, this is yet another proof that what Bengal thinks today India will think tomorrow. Using the cyberworld for flexing the wrong muscles is essentially not funny. It might even prove to be quite dangerously distracting.

Q16. According to the passage, the cyberworld is
(a) beyond the imagination of people.
(b) outside the purview of common people.
(c) not to be governed.
(d) ungovernable.
Ans: (d) ungovernable

Q17. The author is of the opinion that
(a) the centre should start negotiations with Google, Twitter and Facebook
(b) the centre should help the citizens evacuate their city
(c) the centre should not block the sites
(d) the centre should arrest the guilty
Ans: (c) the centre should not block the sites

Q18. Which of the following is closest to the meaning of nebulous?
(a) confused (b) vague
(c) iridescent (d) glowing
Ans: (b) vague

Q19. The author’s seriousness regarding the situation can best be described in the following sentences. Pick the odd one out.
(a) Our leaders should display their powers of censorship when needed.
(b) If this is the official idea of prompt action at a time of crisis among communities, then Indians have more reason to fear their protectors than the nebulous mischiefmaker of the cyberworld.
(c) The politicians deflect attention from their own incompetence.
(d) If a few morphed images and spurious texts can unsettle an entire nation, then there Is something deeply wrong with the nation.
Ans: (a) Our leaders should display their powers of censorship when needed

Q20. The word spurious means
(a) genuine (b) authentic
(c) substantial (d) fake
Ans: (d) fake

Q21. The author warns us against
(a) not playing false with the citizens.
(b) dangers inherent in the cyberworld.
(c) not using the cyberworld judiciously.
(d) not protecting the citizens from dangerous politicians.
Ans: (a) not playing false with the citizens

Q22. Parody means
(a) twist (b) jeopardize
(c) ridicule (d) imitate
Ans: (d) imitate

Q23. What is the opposite of wrong headed ?
(a) silly (b) sane
(c) insane (d) insensible
Ans: (b) sane

Q24. The passage suggests different ways of keeping the public busy with inessentials. Pick the odd one out.
(a) By blocking websites which are vaguely suspicious.
(b) By blaming neighbouring countries across the border.
(c) By turning the attention of the people to violence in Assam.
(d) By getting involved in a discourse on bilateral relations.
Ans: (c) By turning the attention of the people to violence in Assam

Q25. The following is a list of statements made by the author of the above passage. Pick the odd one out.
(a) It is absurd to ban Twitter accounts that parody despatches from the Prime Minister’s Office.
(b) ’Twitterers take these parodies for genuine despatches from the PMO.
(c) To describe such forms of humour as ‘misrepresenting’ the PMO makes the PMO look more ridiculous.
(d) The precedent for such action was set recently by the chief minister of West Bengal.
Ans: (b) Twitterers take these parodies for genuine despatches from the PMO
Directions: You have two passages with 5 questions in each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGE -I The World Health Organisation is briefly called W.H.O. It is a specialised agency of the United Nations and was established in 1948. International health workers can be seen working in all kinds of surroundings: in deserts, jungles, mountains, coconut groves, and rice fields. They help the sick to attain health and the healthy to maintain their health. This global health team assists the local health workers in stopping the spread of what are called communicable diseases, like cholera. These diseases can spread from one country to another and so can be a threat to world health. W.H.O. assists different national health authorities not only in controlling diseases but also in preventing them altogether. Total prevention of diseases is possible in a number of ways. Everyone knows how people, particularly children, are vaccinated against one disease or another. Similarly, most people are familiar with the spraying of houses with poisonous substances which kill diseasecarrying insects.

Q26. It is a specialised agency of the United Nations and was established in 1948. Here specialised means
(a) expert.
(b) extraordinary.
(c) uncommon.
(d) made suitable for a particular purpose.
Ans: (a) expert

Q27. Total prevention of diseases is possible in a number of ways. The author has given illustrations of:
(a) only two such ways.
(b) only one such way.
(c) more than two such ways.
(d) none of these ways.
Ans: (a) only two such ways

Q28. International health workers can be seen working in all kinds of surroundings: in deserts, jungles, mountains, coconut groves, and rice fields. Here International means
(a) drawn from all countries of the world.
(b) believing in cooperation among nations.
(c) belonging to an organisation which has something to do with different nations.
(d) belonging to the whole world.
Ans: (c) belonging to an organisation which has something to do with different nations.

Q29. W.H.O. assists different national health authorities not only in controlling diseases but also in preventing them, altogether. The above sentence implies that
(a) W.H.O. assists more in preventing diseases than in controlling them.
(b) W.H.O: assists in controlling diseases only if they have not been prevented.
(c) W.H.O. assists both in controlling diseases and in preventing them.
(d) W.H.O. assists many others in addition to the national health authorities
Ans: (c) W.H.O. assists both in controlling diseases and in preventing them.

Q30. They help the sick to attain health and the healthy to maintain their health. Here they stands for
(a) rice fields.
(b) international health workers.
(c) jungles.
(d) deserts.
Ans: (b) international health workers

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