You are here
Home > QB Subjectwise > Part 394 – Reading Comprehension Previous Year Questions

Part 394 – Reading Comprehension Previous Year Questions

Directions: You have one brief passage with 5 questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. If we look back on the great political revolutions and the great technological revolutions (both of which are clues to the range of mankind’s capacities and possibilities), we see a striking contrast. Political revolutions, generally speaking, have revealed man’s organised purposefulness, his social conscience, his sense of justice, the aggressive and assertive side of his nature. Technological change, invention and innovation have tended, rather, to reveal his play instinct, his desire and his ability to go where he has never gone, to do what he has never done. The one shows his willingness to sacrifice in order to fulfil his plans and the other his willingness to sacrifice in order to pursue his quest. Many of the peculiar successes and special problems of our time come from our efforts to assimilate these two kinds of activities. We have tried to make government more experimental and to make technological change more purposive, more focussed, more planned than ever before.

Q1. According to the author our peculiar successes and special problems are a result of
(a) our ability to experiment.
(b) man’s organized purposefulness.
(c) our efforts to assimilate political and technological activities.
(d) desire to fulfil our plans.
Ans: (c) our efforts to assimilate political and technological activities

Q2. Man’s assertive and aggressive side of his nature is expressed in
(a) technological revolutions.
(b) political revolutions.
(c) his social conscience.
(d) his play instinct.
Ans: (b) Political revolutions

Q3. Technological revolutions reveal man’s
(a) aggressive side of his nature.
(b) assertive side of his nature.
(c) play instinct.
(d) psychological maturity.
Ans: (c) play instinct

Q4. Man’s willingness to sacrifice to fulfil his plans are attributed to
(a) his organized purposefulness.
(b) his kind nature.
(c) his sense of responsibility.
(d) his ability to go where he has never gone.
Ans: (a) his organized purposefulness

Q5. A striking contrast is established in the passage between
(a) mankind’s capacities and possibilities.
(b) man’s maturity and irresponsibility.
(c) political and technological revolutions achieved by man.
(d) peculiar successes and special problems of our time.
Ans: (c) political and technological revolutions achieved by man
Directions: Read the following passage and mark the correct answers based on the passage. The two dominant features of our age are science and democracy. They have come to stay. We cannot ask educated people to accept the deliverances of faith without rational evidence. Whatever we are called upon to accept must be justified and supported by reason. Otherwise our religious beliefs will be reduced to wishful thinking. Modern man must learn to live with a religion which commends itself to his intellectual conscience, to the spirit of science. Besides, religion should be the sustaining faith of democracy which insists on the intellectual and spiritual development of every human being irrespective of his caste, creed, community, or race. Any religion which divides man from man or supports privileges, exploitation, wars, cannot commend itself to us today.

Q6. In the passage it is said that democracy
(a) should aim at the intellectual growth of all people.
(b) should strengthen religion.
(c) should work for spiritual development of every human being.
(d) Both (a) and (c).
Ans: (d) both (a) and (c)

Q7. Which of the following is correct ?
(a) A good religion supports wars if necessary.
(b) A good religion grants a number of privileges to people.
(c) A good religion divides man from man.
(d) A good religion supports democratic system.
Ans: (d) A good religion supports democratic system

Q8. The writer of the passage stresses the importance of
(a) religion. (b) science.
(c) science and democracy. (d) democracy.
Ans: (c) science and democracy

Q9. The writer says that
(a) educated people are likely to accept faith not supported by reason.
(b) people should have unquestionable faith in religion.
(c) Faith and reason are two separate entities.
(d) Faith without rational evidence may not be acceptable to the educated people.
Ans: (d) Faith without rational evidence may not be acceptable to the educated people

Q10. What, according to the writer, is the role of religion in the present age ?
(a) To promote rational thinking.
(b) To inculcate scientific spirit in man.
(c) To strengthen faith in democracy.
(d) To develop faith in God.
Ans: (b) To inculcate scientific spirit in man
Directions: You have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGE – I Two hundred years after Malthus predicted that population growth would overtake food production by a margin of 256 to 9, the simple fact is that food production had always been ahead of the population growth. Malthus’ doomsday prediction simply did not come true due to two major reasons: first, population did not grow geometrically and birth rates in all Western countries fell during the 20th Century, resulting in very slow population growth. Over the past quarter century, birth rates have been falling in the developing countries too. Second, modern agricultural practices and better irrigation have resulted in tremendous growth in food production in almost all parts of the globe, with the notable exception of subSaharan Africa. Therefore, at the global level, the Malthusian doomsday never befell on us. India’s population grew by about two and a half times in the past 45 years -from 361 million in 1951 to an estimated 916 million in 1995. But during the same period, India’s foodgrain production grew by nearly four times from 51 million tonnes in 1951 to 191 million tonnes in 1995. As a result, the per capita food grain availability in India has gone up considerably since the independence. That is, the Malthusian prediction has not come true even in India.

Q11. In the developing countries, the birth rate is
(a) increasing. (b) doubling.
(c) falling. (d) static.
Ans: (c) falling

Q12. India’s food production from 1951 to 1995 grew nearly
(a) five times. (b) four times.
(c) three times. (d) two times.
Ans: (b) four times

Q13. The food production had always been _____ of population growth.
(a) slow (b) ahead
(c) adequate (d) stagnant
Ans: (b) ahead

Q14. Malthus doomsday prediction did not come true due to two major reasons. They are
(a) rapid growth in population and Industrial development.
(b) very slow growth in population and modern agricultural practices and better irrigation.
(c) increase in percapita income and economic progress.
(d) better facilities in Health and Hygiene.
Ans: (b) very slow growth in population and modern agricultural practices and better irrigation

Q15. In the past forty five years, India’s population has grown about
(a) three and a half times. (b) one and a half times.
(c) five times. (d) two and a half times.
Ans: (d) two and a half times
PASSAGEII The world’s oil reserves are expected to run out by the middle of the next century unless oil consumption is reduced, according to a leading petroleum geologist from the U.S.. Dr. Craig Bond Hatfield, who is at the University of Toledo, Ohio, says the 1,000 billion barrels of known global oil reserves are expected to run out by 2036 unless the current 69-million barrels per day consumption of oil is brought down. Reserves may last for an extra 21 years if estimates of an additional 550 billion barrels of oil yet to be discovered are taken into account. But “a permanent decline in global oil production is virtually certain to begin within 20 years.” Hatfield believes. “Serious planning is needed to deal with the economic consequences.” Hatfield’s comments, which appear in an article in the latest issue of the weekly science journalNature, are likely to provoke controversy. The oil industry, while acknowledging that oil reserves are finite, says Hatfield’s comments are too alarmist. Mr. Julian Chisholm, a spokesman for the World Energy Council in London, a consortium of the world’s leading energy suppliers, says the oil industry is bullish. The general view of the industry and of energy experts is that there is plenty of oil, and real concern about the level of reserves, at least until 2050 is not beyond.

Q16. Unless consumption is reduced, the oil reserve will run out by the middle of
(a) 20th century. (b) 21st century.
(c) 23rd century. (d) 24th century.
Ans: (b) 21st century

Q17. Hatfield’s comment on oil reserve is
(a) not to be taken seriously.
(b) to be taken seriously.
(c) to be made public in oil using countries.
(d) to be circulated in all oil producing countries.
Ans: (a) not to be taken seriously

Q18. To deal with economic consequences
(a) there should be a cut in the use of oil.
(b) serious planning is needed.
(c) oil exploration should be geared up.
(d) manufacture of vehicles should be controlled.
Ans: (b) serious planning is needed

Q19. According to industry and energy experts, there is
(a) short supply of oil. (b) adequate supply of oil.
(c) plenty of oil. (d) increase in oil use.
Ans: (c) plenty of oil

Q20. The current consumption of oil is ____ million barrels.
(a) forty nine (b) fifty nine
(c) sixty nine (d) seventy nine
Ans:
(c) sixty nine
Directions: You have one brief passage with 5 questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. India records the world’s highest percapita incidence of waterborne diseases such as diarrhoea, typhoid and hepatitis, in spite of which concern for safe drinking water is still abysmally low even among educated Indians. This alarming indifference was borne out in a survey conducted by market research agency Research International Ltd. based on a study of 3,000 households spread across all major cities in India. The survey found that over 73 per cent of all households in the highest income categories (SEC A & B) drink tap water without boiling it and as many as 55 per cent of the same group drink tap water after filtration through a cloth, but without boiling. Though every school child knows that unboiled tap water contains unseen disease causing germs, and is unsafe to drink, the high level of indifference to boiling water will come as a surprise to many. Comments Dr. S.S. Narvekar, Deputy Director, Directorate of Health Services, Government of Maharashtra. ” We regularly monitor water quality in all major urban centres in this State. During 1995 – 96, we found that 9,730 out of 159,233 samples of water were contaminated with disease causing organisms, representing a high 6.11 per cent of the total number of samples collected and analysed. This is an alarmingly high level of contamination considering that Maharashtra is one of the more developed states in India and it may be higher in other states. Also during late summer months when there is water scarcity, and during the monsoon season, contamination of drinking water is very high. Hence during these months it is doubly important to ensure drinking water is adequately sanitised.”

Q21. In India the concern for safe drinking water is
(a) very low. (b) good.
(c) enough. (d) more than expected.
Ans: (a) very low

Q22. In the highest income categories, the number of people drink tap water without boiling it is
(a) about half of the house holds.
(b) all the house holds.
(c) nearly three fourths of the households.
(d) one fourth of the households.
Ans: (c) nearly three fourths of the households

Q23. During rainy season, drinking water should be
(a) cleaned. (b) sanitised.
(c) stored. (d) used.
Ans: (b) sanitised

Q24. There is a high level of ______ to boiling water.
(a) interest (b) indifference
(c) care (d) curiosity
Ans:
(b) indifference

Q25. According to the passage, unboiled tap water contains ___.
(a) impurities (b) chemicals
(c) germs (d) waste matter
Ans:
(c) germs
Directions: You have one brief passage with 5 questions. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. Although Indians spend less money on allopathic medicines than people in most Asian Countries, more than 40,000 drug formulations are available here. All manufacturers are required by law to provide information about their product either on the packaging or in a pamphlet inside. But, in many cases, this information is very meagre and hard to understand. Many doctors, too do not tell their patients anything about the drugs they prescribe. What should we be concerned about when we take drugs ? There are two areas: (a) Side effects. Many people taking a drug will notice an undesirable reaction, usually minor. But even the mildest drugs can do harm if taken improperly, long enough or in excessive doses. And everyone responds to a drug differently. (b) Failure to follow directions. Many of us disobey prescription instructions on how much to take and when. It is easy to fall into thinking that more of the drug will speed up the healing. It is more common, however for people to stop taking a drug when they begin to feel better. This, too, can be dangerous. What are the steps to be taken for safety? (a) Take a drug only as recommended on the label or by the doctor. (b) If you feel ill after taking a drug, check it with a doctor. (c) Do not mix drugs . (d) Check whether any food or activities are to be avoided.

Q26. Which one of the following statements is true ?
(a) Indians use more than 40,000 allopathic drugs.
(b) Indians hate allopathic medicines.
(c) Other Asian countries do not have allopathic me dicines.
(d) Indians cannot afford allopathic drugs
Ans: (a) Indians use more than 40,000 allopathic drugs

Q27. How are drug users to be instructed by the manufacturers ?
(a) Doctors should give a manual of instruction.
(b) The Chemist should issue an instruction manual.
(c) Information should be printed on the carton or in a pamphlet kept inside it.
(d) Patients should keep in touch with drug manufacturers.
Ans: (c) Information should be printed on the carton or in a pamphlet kept inside it

Q28. Only one of the following sentences is right. Identify it.
(a) All medicines produce reactions of various degrees in their users.
(b) Even mild drugs are not always safe.
(c) Medicines should be discontinued as soon as we feel better.
(d) More than the prescribed dose brings quicker recovery.
Ans: (b) Even mild drugs are not always safe

Q29. Drug manufacturers ________ .
(a) do not give instructions
(b) give all instructions necessary
(c) give very little and unintelligible information
(d) give information only when asked
Ans: (c) give very little and unintelligible information

Q30. Which one of the following is true?
(a) Throw away the drug that produces side effects and try another.
(b) Drugs may be taken with all kinds of foods.
(c) Drugs do not inhibit our normal life style.
(d) Drugs should be used only according to prescription.
Ans: (d) Drugs should be used only according to prescription

Top
error: Content is protected !!