You are here
Home > QB Subjectwise > Part 390 – Reading Comprehension Previous Year Questions

Part 390 – Reading Comprehension Previous Year Questions

PASSAGEII Among the natural resources which can be called upon in national plan for development, possibly the most important is human labour; without productive labour force, including effective leadership and intelligent middle management, no amount of foreign assistance or natural wealth can ensure successful development and modernisation. One essential factor is usually overlooked or ignored. The forgotten factor is the role of women. Development will be handicapped as long as women remain secondclass citizens, uneducated, without any voice in family or community decisions, without legal or economic status, married when they are still practically children, and thenceforth producing one baby after another, often only to see half of them die before they are of school age. We can enhance development by improving ‘woman power’ by giving women opportunity to develop themselves.

Q1. The most important natural resource for national development is
(a) human labour.
(b) effective leadership.
(c) intelligent middle management.
(d) foreign assistance.
Ans: (a) human labour

Q2. Human power means
(a) only men.
(b) only women.
(c) people including children.
(d) both men and women.
Ans: (d) both men and women

Q3. The ignored and overlooked for factor in the development of the nation is
(a) role of women.
(b) role of middle management.
(c) role of child labour.
(d) role of foreign assistance.
Ans: (a) role of women

Q4. Women have hardly
(a) any voice in family or community decisions.
(b) any economic or legal status.
(c) any voice in family or community decision or legal or economic status.
(d) any voice to decide about themselves.
Ans: (c) any voice in family or community decision or legal or economic status

Q5. Woman power is
(a) an essential power in the development of the nation.
(b) an essential power in child production.
(c) an essential power in marriages.
(d) an essential power in the death of children.
Ans: (a) an essential power in the development of the nation
Directions: You have one brief passage with five questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives. The public sector banks are witnessing in India a period of transition and are at crossroads, where they without giving up social responsibility, should also remain healthy. They need to undertake risky experiments, yet perform it innovatively in a way it does not fail. They should make forays into new areas which are rarely tread by them and lose no emerging opportunities. It should be understood that absence of any bad advance is no sign of efficient banking system. It only indicates immense conservatism. However this is no guarantee for profit. There should be a balance between liquidity and risk. Past sins should be forgotten. Novel and pragmatic techniques should be adopted without which banks would be in danger.

Q6. What, according to the author, are the public sector banks witnessing ?
(a) A period of profit (b) A period of change
(c) A period of certainty (d) A lossmaking period
Ans: (b) A period of change

Q7. In addition to being socially responsible, what does the author want the banks to be ?
(a) Customer friendly
(b) Able to attract foreign investors
(c) Financially healthy
(d) Senseless risktakers
Ans: (c) Financially healthy

Q8. How can the banks take risks without risking a failure ?
(a) By being innovative.
(b) By soliciting the help of the government.
(c) By being financially healthy.
(d) By being conservative.
Ans: (a) By being innovative.

Q9. What does the absence of any bad advance indicate ?
(a) A penchant for risks
(b) Immense conservatism
(c) Financial independence
(d) A deepseated social commitment
Ans: (b) Immense conservatism

Q10. What would happen if novel and pragmatic techniques are ignored ?
(a) Will put the banks in danger.
(b) Will undermine the banks’ social commitment.
(c) Will reveal the untapped talent.
(d) Will result in inefficient portfolio management.
Ans: (b) Will undermine the banks’ social commitment.
Directions: You have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGEI In the past 50 years, doctors across the world have accepted the practice to prescribe antibiotics at the first sign of a trivial infection or treat patients with a handful of antibiotics. These days it is not uncommon to see practitioners prescribing multiple antibiotics without any real indication or relevance for such a combination of drugs. Antibiotics have traditionally been known as miracle drugs, but there is growing evidence that they are overworked miracles, especially in countries like ours where there is easy access to drugs across the counter, including antibiotics. We cannot think of a return to preantibiotic days. Yet the unbridled use of these agents is inexorably propelling us in that direction.

Q11. Antibiotics are called overworked miracles because
(a) they performed miracles.
(b) they are hardly used.
(c) they are overused.
(d) they exhausted their miracles.
Ans: (c) they are overused

Q12. ‘We cannot think of a return to preantibiotic days’ means
(a) antibiotics became indispensable.
(b) we must go back to preantibiotic days.
(c) we cannot stop using antibiotics.
(d) we can stop using antibiotics.
Ans: (c) we cannot stop using antibiotics

Q13. The passage tells us that
(a) the antibiotics work miracles.
(b) the antibiotics are available at the counters.
(c) the use of antibiotics is uncontrollable.
(d) antibiotics are used indiscriminately.
Ans: (d) antibiotics are used indiscriminately

Q14. The passage discusses the use of
(a) drugs in general.
(b) miracle drugs.
(c) antibiotics.
(d) combination of different drugs.
Ans: (c) antibiotics

Q15. These days it is not uncommon to prescribe antibiotics’ means
(a) it is rare to prescribe antibiotics.
(b) it is a common practice to prescribe antibiotics.
(c) it is not a common practice to prescribe antibiotics.
(d) it is compulsory to prescribe antibiotics.
Ans: (b) it is a common practice to prescribe antibiotics
Passage II Among Nature’s most intriguing phenomena are the partnerships formed by any different species. The name used for these relationships, Symbiosis, comes from Greek meaning “living together”. Not all symbiotic relationships are the same. There are some called commensal relationships, in which one partner gains a benefit while the other gains little or none but is not harmed. One example is the relationship between two types of fish – remoras and sharks. The remora, which is long and often striped, attaches itself to a shark (sometimes to another type of fish or a whale), using a sucker on its head. When the shark makes a kill, the hitchhiker briefly detaches itself to feed on the scraps. Another type of symbiotic relationship is parasitism, in which one partner benefits at the expense of others. Ticks and tapeworms are among familiar parasites. The third type of symbiotic relationship, called mutualism, is a true partnership in which both partners benefit. The relationship may be limited as when zebras and wildbeast graze together on the vast African grasslands. Each species can survive on its own, but together their chances of detecting predators are improved because each contributes a specially keen sense. (Zebras have the better eyesight; wildbeast, hearing and sense of smell). In a few cases partners are so interdependent that one cannot survive without the other. Most mutualistic relationships probably lie somewhere in betwe

Q16. Remora attaches itself to the shark or whale
(a) by entwining its long body around the bigger fish.
(b) by biting into the fish’s body with its teeth.
(c) with an adhesive organ found in its head.
(d) with a hook like structure in its head.
Ans: (c) with an adhesive organ found in its head

Q17. Commensal relationship is a type of symbiosis in which the relationship is beneficial
(a) to one and harmless to other.
(b) to one and harmful to other.
(c) to both.
(d) to both for a very short time.
Ans: (a) to one and harmless to other

Q18. The passage talks about how animals
(a) help each other.
(b) live together.
(c) take advantage of the weaker ones.
(d) are related to each other.
Ans: (d) are related to each other

Q19. Parasites
(a) are neither beneficial nor harmful to animals they are with.
(b) benefit at the expense of the animals they live with.
(c) are beneficial to the animals they live with.
(d) harm the animals they live with.
Ans: (b) benefit at the expense of the animals they live with

Q20. Remora feeds
(a) on the shark it travels with.
(b) on the leftover parts of the shark’s prey.
(c) by detaching itself to attack the prey.
(d) on a whale or another type of fish.
Ans: (b) on the leftover parts of the shark’s prey
Directions: You have two brief passages with five questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGE–I Power and possession have been central pursuits of modern civilisation for a long time. They blocked out or distorted other features of the western renaissance (revival) which promised so much for humanity. What people have been and are still being taught to prize are money, success, control over the lives of others, acquisition of more and more objects. Modern social, political, and economic systems, whether capitalist, fascist or communist, reject in their working the basic principle that the free and creative unfoldment of every man, woman and child is the true measure of the worth of any society. Such unfoldment requires understanding and imagination, integrity and compassion, cooperation among people and harmony between the human species and the rest of nature. Acquisitiveness and the pursuit of power have made the modern man an aggressor against everything that is nonhuman; an exploiter and oppressor of those who are poor, meek and unorganised; a pathological type which hates and distrusts the world and suffers from both acute loneliness and false pride.

Q21. The author appears to be advocating which of the following approaches to be adopted by society.
(a) Capitalistic (b) Communists
(c) Humanistic (d) Authoritarian
Ans: (c) Humanistic

Q22. Which of the following best describes the behaviour of modern man?
(a) Imaginative and sympathetic.
(b) Cruel and greedy.
(c) Conscientious and cooperative.
(d) Percepting and creative.
Ans: (b) Cruel and greedy

Q23. According to the passage, why has modern man turned out as an enemy of everything that is nonhuman?
(a) He has been dominated by drives of acquisitiveness and power.
(b) He consciously practises spirit of cooperation.
(c) Nonhumans have refused cooperation to human beings.
(d) He hates and distrusts other human beings.
Ans: (c) Nonhumans have refused cooperation to human beings

Q24. Which of the following statements is not true in context of the given passage ?
(a) Power and possession go hand in hand.
(b) The modern man is not individualist.
(c) There is a need for a new renaissance.
(d) Poor and weak people are oppressed by the modern man.
Ans: (d) Poor and weak people are oppressed by the modern man

Q25. Which of the following is one of the requirements bringing out the best is man ?
(a) Money. (b) Success.
(c) Power. (d) Understanding.
Ans: (d) Understanding
PASSAGEII Child psychology is certainly not a strong point with most Indian schools; why else would they inflict a double trauma on a student forming badly in the preboards by banning her from taking the board exams. Often with fatal results as evidenced by reports of student suicides in the runup to the boards. Now the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) has stepped in and put the brakes on this discriminatory practice, ruling that no student can be barred from the Boards without prior clearance from the CBSE. This is good news for parents and students, many of whom have had to live with the threat of performancelinked department. While the school’s logic is that in order to attract talented students, they need to maintain their performance records at high levels. Chances are that a student faring poorly at the preboards will replicate this at the boards is faulty. Chances are that the student will be spurred to work doubly hard. On the other hand, the threat of debarment, will almost certainly impact adversely on his/ her performance. Of course, linking preboards to the boards is only one of the problems with our school system.

Q26. Which is the good news for parents, according to the passage?
(a) School will take the responsibility of preparing students for the board.
(b) School will provide study facilities to the poor student.
(c) Schools will enforce discipline to ensure higher attendance of students.
(d) No students can be barred from the Boards without prior clearance from the CBSE.
Ans: (d) No students can be barred from the Boards without prior clearance from the CBSE

Q27. What is the ruling of the CBSE ?
(a) Students must pass the preboard exam before appearing for the Board exam.
(b) Schools should follow the practice of performancelinked debarment.
(c) Schools should maintain the performance record of students at high level.
(d) Schools must motivate students to work hard.
Ans: (a) Students must pass the preboard exam before appearing for the Board exam.

Q28. What is the faulty assumption of schools, according to the passage?
(a) Students who do not do well at preboards will be motivated to work hard.
(b) Preboards are generally easy and therefore students take them lightly.
(c) Students who fare poorly at the preboard will fail at the boards.
(d) Learning by note is a better method of learning.
Ans: (c) Students who fare poorly at the preboard will fail at the boards

Q29. Which of the following according to the passage is the problem with our school system ?
(a) Providing study facilities to the students.
(b) Linking preboard performance of students to the boards.
(c) Teacher’s lack of knowledge of child psychology.
(d) Attracting talented students
Ans: (d) Attracting talented students

Q30. According to the passage, parents had to live with the threat of
(a) falling grades of their wards.
(b) not getting their wards admitted in the quality schools.
(c) schools not treating their wards with the attitude of counsellor.
(d) linking performance of their wards in preboards to the debarment.
Ans: (d) linking performance of their works in preboards to the debarment

Top
error: Content is protected !!