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Part 389 – Reading Comprehension Previous Year Questions

PASSAGEII In an effort to produce the largest, fastest and most luxurious ship afloat, the British built the S.S. Titanic. It was so superior to anything else on the seas that it was dubbed ‘unsinkable’. So sure of this were the owners that they provided only twenty life boats and rafts, less than onehalf the number needed for the 2,227 passengers on board. Many passengers were aboard the night it rammed an iceberg only two days at sea and more than halfway between England and its NewYork destination. Because the luxury liner was travelling so fast, it was impossible to avoid the ghostly looking iceberg. An unextinguished fire also contributed to the ship’s submersion. Panic increased the number of casualties as people jumped into the icy water or fought to be among the few to board the life boats. Four hours after the mishap, another ship, the ‘Carpathia’, rescued 705 survivors. The infamous S. S. Titanic had enjoyed only two days of sailing glory on its maiden voyage in 1912 before plunging into 12,000 feet of water near the coast of Newfoundland where it lies today.

Q1. All of the following are true except that
(a) Only a third of those aboard perished
(b) The Carpathia rescued the survivors
(c) The S.S. Titanic sank near Newfoundland
(d) The S.S. Titanic was the fastest ship afloat in 1912
Ans: (a) only a third of those aboard perished

Q2. All of the following contributed to the large death toll except
(a) panic (b) fire
(c) speed (d) The Carpathia
Ans: (d) The Carpathia

Q3. How many days was the S.S. Titanic at sea before sinking ?
(a) 2 (b) 4
(c) 6 (d) 12
Ans: (a) 2

Q4. Maiden voyage is closest in meaning to
(a) inaugural (b) most elegant
(c) longest (d) final
Ans: (a) inaugural

Q5. What does this passage convey?
(a) The S.S. Titanic proved itself the most seaworthy vessel in 1912
(b) Attempts to rescue the S.S. Titanic’s survivors were not successful
(c) Overconfidence by builders and owners was greatly responsible for the sinking of the vessel
(d) A fire and panic were the only causes for the sinking of the ship
Ans:
(c) Overconfidence by builders and owners was greatly responsible for the sinking of the vessel
Directions: You have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGEI The Printing Press has made knowledge available to the vast multitude of peoplePray, what kind of knowledge is it ? Is it of any permanent character ? Books have become common and, when we say that books like the Sexton Blake series sell like hot cakes, we have an index of the nature of knowledge which a typical person in a vast multitude seeks. Let me tell you of an incident that took place in America a few years ago. An American publisher printed a million copies of the works of Charles Dickens in the hope that he could easily sell them on the name of the author. But to his disappointment, not even the widest publicity and advertisement could enable him to sell the books. Being sorely tired, he hit on a plan. He tore off the cover pages, substituted covers containing sensational love headings for the titles and again advertised the new books. In a week, all the books were sold out. We are not concerned here with the moral of the bookseller’s action. What we have to note is that only books of a sensational type are really sought for by the ordinary folk who have a great aversion to serious study. So, you will see that the grand argument that the Printing Press has made knowledge available even to the masses is certainly fallacious and quite misleading. To put it correctly, it has created a taste for a low order of books.

Q6. Sexton Blake series are big sellers because they
(a) disseminate knowledge.
(b) are informative.
(c) satisfy a typically serious reader.
(d) are sensational.
Ans: (d) are sensational

Q7. The American publisher had chosen the works of Charles Dickens to
(a) give wide publicity to Dickens’ works.
(b) offer the readers what best he could.
(c) counter the trash.
(d) make money easily.
Ans: (d) make money easily

Q8. What is the main contention of the passage ?
(a) To stress the popularity of the printing press.
(b) To point out the disappointment of serious readers.
(c) To shed light on the morale of the publishers.
(d) To bring out the evil impacts of the printing press.
Ans: (d) To bring out the evil impacts of the printing press.

Q9. The author’s contention makes us feel that he
(a) is unilateral in his argument.
(b) is balanced.
(c) is a typical critic.
(d) argues convincingly.
Ans: (d) argues convincingly

Q10. Who is Charles Dickens ?
(a) A playwright. (b) An epic poet.
(c) A short story writer. (d) A novelist.
Ans: (d) A novelist
PASSAGEII Our awareness of time has reached such a pitch of intensity that we suffer acutely whenever our travels take us into some corner of the world where people are not interested in minutes and seconds. The unpunctuality of the orient, for example is appalling to those who come freshly from a land of fixed mealtimes and regular train services. For a modern American or Englishman, waiting is a psychological torture. An Indian accepts the blank hours with resignation, even with satisfaction. He has not lost the fine art of doing nothing. Our notion of time as a collection of minutes, each of which must be filled with some business or amusement, is wholly alien to the Greek. For the man who lives in a preindustrial world, time moves at a slow and easy pace; he does not care about each minute, for the good reason that he has not been made conscious of the existence of minutes.

Q11. What is the main theme of the passage ?
(a) Concept of time in preindustrial world.
(b) The Greek concept of time.
(c) Awareness of time in the modern industrial world.
(d) The orientals and their awareness of time.
Ans: (c) Awareness of time in the modern industrial world

Q12. The orientals are alien to
(a) the business of amusement.
(b) the notion of time as a collection of minutes.
(c) industrialization.
(d) the fine art of doing nothing.
Ans: (b) the notion of time as a collection of minutes

Q13. A person who belongs to preindustrial world
(a) knows the utility of time.
(b) knows how to derive happiness by making use of time carefully.
(c) does not care about each minute.
(d) cares much for every minute.
Ans: (c) does not care about each minute

Q14. According to the author
(a) the orientals are very punctual.
(b) the Americans or the Englishmen are punctual.
(c) the Greek and the orientals are very punctual.
(d) the Indians are very punctual.
Ans: (b) the Americans or the Englishmen are punctual

Q15. The orient in the passage refers to
(a) China and Japan. (b) Japan and England.
(c) England and America. (d) America alone.
Ans: (a) China and Japan
Directions: You have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGEI In the technological systems of tomorrowfast, fluid and selfregulatingmachines will deal with the flow of physical materials; men with the flow of information and insight. Machines will increasingly perform tasks. Machines and men both, instead of being concentrated in gigantic factories and factory cities, will be scattered across the globe, linked together by amazingly sensitive, nearinstantaneous communications. Human work will move out of the factory and mass office into the community and the home. Machines will be synchronized, as some already are, to the billionth of a second; men will be desynchronized. The factory whistle will vanish. Even the clock, “the key machine of the modern industrial age” as Lewis Mumford called it a generation ago, will lose some of its power over humans, as distinct from purely technological affairs. Simultaneously, the organisation needed to control technology shift from bureaucracy to Adhocracy, from permanence to transience, and from a concern with the present to a focus on the future. In such a world, the most valued attributes of the industrial age become handicaps. The technology of tomorrow requires not millions of lightly lettered men, ready to work in unison at endlessly repetitive jobs, it requires not men who take orders in unblinking fashion, aware that the price of bread is mechanical submission to authority, but men who can make critical judgments, who can weave their way through novel environments, who are quick to spot new relationships in the rapidly changing reality. It requires men who, in C.P. Snow’s compelling terms, “have the future in their bones”.

Q16. The technological system of tomorrow will be marked by
(a) dehumanization. (b) perfection.
(c) automation. (d) unpredictability.
Ans: (c) automation

Q17. The future man, according to this passage, must be
(a) most adaptative and intelligent.
(b) most capable of dealing with the changing reality.
(c) more concerned with the present than the future.
(d) trained and obedient.
Ans: (b) most capable of dealing with the changing reality

Q18. Nearinstantaneous communications may be regarded as a symbol of
(a) anachronization. (b) mischronization.
(c) desynchronization. (d) synchronization.
Ans: (d) synchronization

Q19. If a person believes that the price of bread is mechanical submission to authority, he is
(a) a believer in devotion to duty.
(b) a believer in taking things for granted.
(c) a believer in doing what he is told, right or wrong.
(d) a believer in the honesty of machines.
Ans: (c) a believer in doing what he is told, right or wrong

Q20. The type of society which the author has mentioned makes a plea for
(a) a mind assimilative of modern scientific ideas.
(b) a critical mind having insight into future.
(c) a mind wellversed in cultural heritage.
(d) a mind with firm principles of life.
Ans: (b) a critical mind having insight into future
PASSAGEII A reason why people at school read books is to please their teacher. The teacher has said that this, that, or the other is a good book, and that it is a sign of good taste to enjoy it. So a number of boys and girls, anxious to please their teacher, get the book and read it. Two or three of them may genuinely like it, for their own sake, and be grateful to the teacher for putting it in their way. But many will not honestly like it, or will persuade themselves that they like it. And that does a great deal of harm. The people who cannot like the book run the risk of two things happening to them; either they are put off the idea of the booklet us suppose the book was David Copperfieldeither they are put off the idea of classical novels, or they take a dislike to Dickens, and decide firmly never to waste their time on anything of the sort again; or they get a guilty conscience about the whole thing, they feel that they do not like what they ought to like and that therefore there is something wrong with them. They are quite mistaken, of course. There is nothing wrong with them. The mistake has all been on the teacher’s side. What has happened is that they have been shoved up against a book before they were ready for it. It is like giving a young child food only suitable for an adult. Result: indigestion, violent stomachache, and a rooted dislike of that article of food evermore.

Q21. The passage is about what
(a) we should do to make children read.
(b) we should not do when we ask children to read.
(c) teachers should teach in the classroom.
(d) treatment is to be given for indigestion.
Ans: (a) we should do to make children read

Q22. The writer says that teachers should
(a) prevent children from reading any book.
(b) compel children to read moral stories.
(c) stop compelling children to read books recommended by them.
(d) carefully supervise what children read.
Ans: (c) stop compelling children to read books recommended by them

Q23. According to the author many boys and girls read books to
(a) win the favour of their teachers.
(b) spend money in a useful way.
(c) express their gratitude to their teachers.
(d) show others that they are lovers of books.
Ans: (a) win the favour of their teachers

Q24. The mistake has been on the teacher’s side. Here the mistake refers to
(a) making the children to please the teacher.
(b) asking the children to read books which teachers do not like.
(c) discouraging children from reading more books.
(d) recommending them the books intended for adults.
Ans: (d) recommending them the books intended for adults.

Q25. Indigestion and violent stomachache will be the result if the child
(a) reads books not suitable for his age.
(b) does not read any book.
(c) is forced to eat food meant for adults.
(d) is not taken to doctor regularly.
Ans: (a) reads books not suitable for his age
Directions: You have two brief passages with 5 questions following each passages. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGEI The interview may be conducted by letter and by telephone, as well as in person. Letter and telephone interviews are less satisfactory. Direct contact with an individual and a facetoface relationship often provide a stimulating situation for both interviewer and interviewee. Personal reaction and interaction aid not only in rapport but also in obtaining nuances and additional information by the reactions which are more fully observed in a facetoface relationship. Adequate preparation for the interview is a “must”. Careful planning saves not only time but also energy of both parties concerned. The interview is used to obtain facts or subjective data such as individual opinions, attitudes, and preferences. Interviews are used to check on questionnaires which may have been used to obtain data, or when a problem being investigated is complex, or when the information needed to solve it cannot be secured easily in any other way. People will often give information orally but will not put it in writing.

Q26. The intention of the writer of this passage is to
(a) warn the readers against conducting interviews.
(b) instruct people on the best means of conducting interviews.
(c) tell people how to make friends with interviewers.
(d) advise people on the use of letters and telephone.
Ans: (b) instruct people on the best means of conducting interviews

Q27. According to the author the best way to conduct interviews is
(a) to talk to the interviewees over telephone.
(b) to write letters to the interviewees.
(c) to observe the interviewees from a distance.
(d) to have a direct conversation with the interviewees.
Ans: (d) to have a direct conversation with the interviewees

Q28. If I want to interview someone,
(a) all I need to do is to just drop in and have a talk with the person.
(b) I ought to plan and prepare for the interview well in advance.
(c) I have to ring up the person and ask him/her all the questions I want to.
(d) establishing good rapport with the person will be enough.
Ans: (b) I ought to plan and prepare for the interview well in advance

Q29. Facetoface interaction with the interviewees enables the interviewer to
(a) understand shades of meaning not readily available in written responses.
(b) observe the physical stature of the interviewee.
(c) listen to the voice of the interviewee directly.
(d) compel the interviewees to express their opinions in writing.
Ans: (a) understand shades of meaning not readily available in written responses

Q30. The author used ‘individual opinions’, ‘attitudes’ and ‘preferences’ as examples of
(a) objective data about the interviewees.
(b) abstract philosophical concepts irrelevant to the interview process.
(c) psychological properties particular to a given interviewee.
(d) likes and dislikes common to interviewers and interviewees.
Ans: (c) psychological properties particular to a given interviewee

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