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Part 388 – Reading Comprehension Previous Year Questions

Directions: In these questions, you have two brief passages with five questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGE–I What one wonders, is the lowest common denominator of Indian culture today. The attractive Hema Malini The songs of Vividh Bharati Or the mouthwatering Masala Dosa Delectable as these may be, each yields pride of place to that false symbol of a new era–the synthetic fibre. In less than twenty years, the nylon sari and the terylene shirt have swept the countryside, penetrated to the farthest corners of the land and persuaded every common man, woman and child that the key to success in the present day world lies in artificial fibres: glass nylon, crepe nylon, tery mixes, polysters and what have you. More than the bicycles, the wristwatch or the transistor radio, synthetic clothes have come to represent the first step away from the village square. The village lass treasures the flashy nylon sari in her trousseau most dearly; the village youth gets a great kick out of his cheap terrycot shirt and trousers, the nearest he can approximate to the expensive synthetic sported by his wealthy citybred contemporaries. And the Neo–rich craze for ‘phoren’is nowhere more apparent than in the price that people will pay for smuggled, stolen, begged, borrowed secondhand or thrown away synthetics. Alas, even the unique richness of the traditional tribal costume is being fast eroded by the deadening uniformity of nylon.

Q1. The lowest common denominator of the Indian culture today is
(a) Hema Malini
(b) songs of Vividh Bharati
(c) Masala Dosa
(d) synthetic fibre
Ans: (d) synthetic fibre

Q2. The synthetic fibre has
(a) always been popular in India.
(b) become popular during the last twenty years.
(c) never been popular in India.
(d) been as popular as other kinds of fibre.
Ans: (b) become popular during the last twenty years

Q3. The latest symbol of modernity for the rural people is
(a) the bicycle. (b) the wristwatch.
(c) the transistor. (d) the synthetic cloth.
Ans: (d) the synthetic cloth

Q4. The term Neorich means
(a) the aristocracy.
(b) the industrialists.
(c) the newly rich people.
(d) the common people.
Ans: (c) the newly rich people

Q5. The tone of the passage is
(a) tragic (b) ironic
(c) sombre (d) satiric
Ans:
(c) sombre
PASSAGEII Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English language is in a bad way, but it is generally assumed that we cannot by conscious action do anything about it. Our civilization is decadent and our language— so the argument runs—must inevitably share in the general collapse. It follows that any struggle against the abuse of language is a sentimental archaism, like preferring candles to electric light or handsome cabs to aeroplanes. Underneath this lies the halfconscious belief that language is a natural growth and not an instrument which we shape for our own purposes. Now it is clear that the decline of a language must ultimately have political and economic causes: it is not simply due to the bad influence of this or that individual writer. But an effect can become a cause, reinforcing the original cause and producing the same effect in an intensified form, and so on indefinitely. A man may take to drink because he feels himself to be a failure, and then fails all the more completely because he drinks. It is rather the same thing that is happening to the English language. It becomes ugly and inaccurate because our thoughts are foolish, but the slovenliness of our language makes it easier for us to have foolish thoughts. The point is that the process is reversible. Modern English, especially written English, is full of bad habits which spread by imitation and which can be avoided if one is willing to take the necessary trouble. If one gets rid of these habits, one can think more clearly, and to think clearly is a necessary first step towards political regeneration: so that the fight against bad English is not frivolous and is not the exclusive concern of professional writers.

Q6. Many people believe that nothing can be done about the English language because
(a) bad habits spread by imitation.
(b) we live in a decadent civilization.
(c) there are too many bad writers.
(d) people are too lazy to change their bad habits.
Ans: (d) people are too lazy to change their bad habits

Q7. The author believes that
(a) it’s now too late to do anything about the problem.
(b) language is a natural growth and cannot be shaped for our own purposes.
(c) the decline in the language can be stopped.
(d) the process of an increasingly bad language cannot be stopped.
Ans: (c) the decline in the language can be stopped

Q8. The author believes that the first stage towards the political regeneration of the language would be
(a) taking the necessary trouble to avoid bad habits.
(b) avoiding being frivolous about it.
(c) clear thinking.
(d) for professional writers to help.
Ans: (a) taking the necessary trouble to avoid bad habits

Q9. The author believes that
(a) English is becoming ugly.
(b) bad language habits are inevitable.
(c) our thoughts are becoming uglier because we are making the language uglier.
(d) our civilization is decadent so nothing can be done to stop the decline of the language.
Ans: (c) our thoughts are becoming uglier because we are making the language uglier

Q10. What causes bad language in the end ?
(a) The bad influence of individual writers.
(b) The imitation of bad language habits.
(c) Political and economic causes.
(d) An assumption that nothing can be done about it.
Ans: (c) Political and economic causes
Directions: You have two brief passages with five questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGEI The achievement of science in the twentieth century has been very great. Its influence can be felt in every sphere of life. From the small pins and needles to the huge iron sheets and joints, most of the things we require for our everyday use, come out of factories where scientific principles are utilized for practical ends. Science has enabled man to bring forces of nature under control and to use them for his own advantage. It has brought the distant parts of the world close together. Our knowledge of the universe has been much widened on account of the untiring efforts of the astronomers like Jeans and Eddington. Remarkable cures of human diseases have been possible owing to the discovery of some wonderful medicines.

Q11. The main idea of the passage is
(a) the impact of science can be felt in every sphere of life
(b) science is an anathema
(c) nothing is beyond the purview of science
(d) science can work miracles
Ans: (a) The impact of science can be felt in every sphere of life

Q12. The mode of approach is
(a) logical. (b) anatomical.
(c) descriptive. 4) expository.
Ans: (d) expository

Q13. What has enabled man to harness the forces of nature to the advantage of mankind?
(a) Arts. (b) Oratory.
(c) Bravery. (d) Science.
Ans: (d) Science

Q14. Science has proved a great boon for
(a) scientists. (b) artists.
(c) explorers. (d) mankind.
Ans: (d) mankind

Q15. The most appropriate title for the passage will be
(a) Science is a curse
(b) Science, a great boon
(c) Achievements of science
(d) None of these
Ans:
(b) Science, a great boon
PASSAGEII “Science cannot reduce the magic of a sunset to arithmetic, nor can it express friendship with a formula” observed the eminent medical researcher, Dr. Lous Orr. He added, “also beyond science’s mastery of nature are love and laughter, pain and loneliness and insights into truth and beauty”. This distancing of science from the human condition perhaps explains why most foreign tourists visiting Britain flock predictably to see the hallowed homes of playwrights, writers and poets, but choose to ignore the habitations where its eminent scientists lived and worked.

Q16. Why is it that science cannot express friendship with a formula?
(a) Science and friendship cannot coexist.
(b) It is abstract term which cannot be grappled by science.
(c) Friendship is beyond science’s mastery.
(d) Friendship is unknown to scientists.
Ans: (c) Friendship is beyond science’s mastery

Q17. The word magic refers to
(a) evening dusk.
(b) the sunrise.
(c) solar and lunar eclipse.
(d) setting of the sun, with all its beauty.
Ans: (d) setting of the sun, with all its beauty

Q18. Which of the following are beyond science’s reach, according to the passage?
(a) Love and laughter, pain and loneliness.
(b) Derivation of a formula.
(c) Complexity of time and tide.
(d) Work of the mind.
Ans: (a) Love and laughter, pain and loneliness

Q19. The verb flock refers to.
(a) tourists in Britain.
(b) local people.
(c) large number of foreign tourists visiting homes of playwrights, writers, poets.
(d) Indian tourists.
Ans: (c) large number of foreign tourists visiting homes of playwrights, writers, poets

Q20. Why according to the author do tourists prefer to visit hallowed homes of playwrights, writers and poets rather than visiting the habitation of eminent scientists?
(a) The houses of playwright and writers are welldecorated and are full of splendour
(b) Science cannot explain human emotions. Hence, people have a soft corner for those who produce a splendid display of emotions in their work.
(c) Scientists are loathsome.
(d) Houses of scientists are untidy and not wellpreserved.
Ans: (b) Science cannot explain human emotions. Hence, people have a soft corner for those who produce a splendid display of emotions in their work.
Directions: You have a brief passage with 5 questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGE There are three main groups of oilsanimal, vegetable and mineral. Great quantities of animal oil comes from whales, those enormous creatures of the sea, which are the largest of the animals remaining in the world. To protect the whales from the cold of the Arctic seas, nature has provided them with a thick covering of fat, called blubber. When the whale is killed, the blubber is stripped off and boiled down. It produces a great quantity of oil which can be made into food for human consumption. A few other creatures yield oil, but none so much as the whale. The livers of the cod and halibut, two kinds of fish, yield nourishing oil. Both cod liver oil and halibut oil are given to sick children and other invalids who need certain vitamins. Vegetable oil has been known from very old times. No household can get on without it, for it is used in cooking. Perfumes may be made from the oils of certain flowers. Soaps are made from vegetable and animal product and the oils of certain flowers.

Q21. The main source of animal oil is
(a) fish. (b) whale.
(c) sea weeds. (d) plants.
Ans: (b) whale

Q22. Vegetable oil is mainly used for
(a) eating. (b) cooking.
(c) frying. (d) lubricating.
Ans: (b) cooking

Q23. The ……. of fish yeilds nourishing oil.
(a) liver (b) stomach
(c) eyes (d) head
Ans: (a) liver

Q24. The thick protective covering of fat on a whale is called a
(a) skin. (b) cells.
(c) blubber. (d) fins.
Ans: (c) blubber

Q25. ……. are made from vegetable, animal products and the oils of certain flowers.
(a) Perfumes (b) Cosmetics
(c) Cooking medium (d) Soaps
Ans:
(d) Soaps
Directions: You have two brief passages with five questions following each passage. Read the passages carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.
PASSAGEI Vacations were once the prerogative of the privileged few, even as late as the nineteenth century. Now they are considered the right of all, except for such unfortunate masses as in China, for whom life, except for sleep and brief periods of rest, is uninterrupted toil. They are more necessary now than before because the average life is well rounded and has become increasingly departmentalised. The idea of vacations, as we conceive it must be incomprehensible to primitive people. Rest of some kind has of course always been a part of the rhythm of human life, but earlier ages did not find it necessary to organise it in the way that modern man has done. Holidays, feast days, were sufficient. With modern man’s increasing tensions, with the useless quality of so much of his work, this break in the year’s routine became steadily more necessary. Vacations became necessary for the purpose of renewal and repair.

Q26. The author’s main purpose in this passage is to
(a) explore the history of vacations.
(b) tell why vacations have become more common.
(c) contrast holidays and festive occasions with vacation.
(d) demonstrate that vacations are not really necessary.
Ans: (a) explore the history of vacations

Q27. According to the passage, we need vacations now more than ever because we have
(a) a more carefree nature
(b) much more free time
(c) little diversity in our work
(d) a higher standard of living
Ans: (a) a more carefree nature

Q28. It is implied in the passage that our lives are very
(a) habitual (b) patriotic
(c) varied (d) independent
Ans: (c) varied

Q29. As used in the passage the word prerogative (line)
(a) habit (b) privilege
(c) request (d) hope
Ans: (b) privilege

Q30. The contemporary attitude towards vacations is best expressed by which of the following proverbs ?
(a) A penny saved is penny earned.
(b) The devil finds work for idle hands.
(c) All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.
(d) Many hands make light work.
Ans: (c) All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy

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